Monthly Archives: June 2014

Are we therefore not Zimbabweans?

Cathy - Buckle

Cathy – Buckle

I was relaxing at home as you   do , when my eyes caught a blog by one of my favourite bloggers and writers , Cathy Buckle , every time this brilliant lady puts a blog out there i have to read it because i feel she is talking about the problems that beset every single citizen of this country who have been Marginalised and mistreated . so i thought i would share some of her thoughts and work with you . Her website is http://www.cathybuckle.com/ if you feel like having a look.

By Cathy Buckle

We, people of mixed race, want to know and want to know now. If you, black, indigenous people decide that we have no future here, lets us know plain and simple.

Cathy Buckle

“Don’t lead us down the garden path pretending you want nationhood for all Zimbabweans and then pick us off one by one when it’s convenient.”

These words by a contributor to a report on an Internet news site last week couldn’t have said it better when it comes to describing the pitiful state of affairs in our country.

White, brown or beige, born and bred Zimbabweans have all become helpless pawns on the country’s chess board.

We are living in a state of constant uncertainty, not knowing when another law will change and discriminate against us or if our life’s work and assets are ever going to be safe here again because of our skin colour.

One by one, minorities in Zimbabwe are waiting to be picked off depending on who is in power or which piece of land, farm, mine, business or asset is trying to be seized for self enrichment.

The mixed-race Internet contributor saying that he just wanted to know if he had a future in Zimbabwe, was responding to the report about ex-Gwanda Mayor Lionel de Necker.

Like thousands of white Zimbabweans before him, De Necker said he had just been visited by officials from the National Indigenisation Authority.

De Necker was told he was breaking the law because ‘‘foreigners’’ cannot own more than 49 percent shares in businesses such as his which deal in the retail sector.

De Necker, born and resident in Zimbabwe had been assumed to be “foreign” because of his name.

Like thousands of white Zimbabweans in the same situation, De Necker said he was born in this country but was now being targeted by Indigenisation officials because he was of ‘‘a particular race.’’

De Necker, a mixed race Zimbabwean, expressed exactly the same sentiments as thousands of white Zimbabweans when they were being evicted from their homes during land seizures.

“Many people do not understand the feeling of trepidation and uncertainty associated with waking up one day and finding that you have been stripped of your country and possessions on the say-so of some official.

“Right now I am worried about my family and for every person of my racial background who may be contributing immensely to the economy but faces an uncertain future under the current policy.”

This is exactly how it felt for farmers: waking up each morning and wondering if that would be the day their life’s work would be grabbed by a rabble at the gate.

Wondering then, and still wondering now, 14 years later, if they would ever get paid for their seized home, buildings and infrastructure which was taken because they were of a particular race.

De Necker’s employees and their families and dependents are undoubtedly feeling exactly the same way thousands of farm workers felt when their employers were being targeted: will they have a job tomorrow, next month, next year?

How will they pay their rent, feed their families, find school fees?

White, mixed Race, Indian or whatever skin colour God gave us — if we are born in Zimbabwe, then we are Zimbabweans.

We did not choose to be born here but we do choose to live here and contribute to the country and economy.

Whichever way you look at it, empowering a few is disempowering a nation and is plain and simple racism.

Two wrongs will never make a right.

 

After 34 Years of Mugabe: From Darling to Despot, and from Hope to Hunger

Reminders are always painfull especially when things and situiations have gone terribly wrong

Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation

Think Africa Press

Zimbabwe’s Robert Mugabe is living proof that power corrupts, and that a cult of personality can devastate a country otherwise brimming with potential.

By Jeffrey Smith

Robert Mugabe accepting a gift from New Zealand in 1980. Photograph by Archives New Zealand. Robert Mugabe accepting a gift from New Zealand in 1980. Photograph by Archives New Zealand.

On 17 April, 1980, Robert Mugabe addressed a euphoric crowd in the soon-to-be- independent Zimbabwe. In the aftermath of a long and brutal liberation struggle against white minority rule, Mugabe seemed to publicly embrace the ideals of peace and reconciliation. By becoming Zimbabwe’s leader he ostensibly vanquished the ugly specter of colonialism and racism that had defined the country formerly known as Rhodesia, and entered office buoyed by a wave of international fanfare and support.

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MANY NIGERIANS MUST HAVE ROCKED WITH LAUGHTER HEARING SHAMELESS MUGABE TALKING ABOUT “NIGERIAN CORRUPTION”…

MILE2HERALD (OMG! NEWS AND INFO)

MANY NIGERIANS MUST HAVE ROCKED WITH LAUGHTER HEARING SHAMELESS MUGABE TALKING ABOUT "NIGERIAN CORRUPTION"...

Mugabe’s legacy of poverty and despair

On 17 April 1980, President Robert Mugabe addressed a euphoric crowd in the soon-to-be-independent Zimbabwe.

In the aftermath of a long and brutal liberation struggle against white minority rule, Mugabe seemed to publicly embrace the ideals of peace and reconciliation.

By becoming Zimbabwe’s leader, he ostensibly vanquished the ugly spectre of colonialism and racism that had defined the country formerly known as Rhodesia, and entered office buoyed by a wave of international fanfare and support.

It was in this context, on the eve of Zimbabwe’s independence, that Mugabe declared:

“Democracy is never mob rule … Our independence must thus not be construed as an instrument vesting individuals or groups with the right to harass and intimidate others … Our new nation requires … a new spirit that must unite and not divide.”

This hopeful rhetoric would almost immediately ring hollow.

By July, a state…

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Zimbabwe: $770 Million in Potential Revenue Lost

When the truth finaly hits home sadly it will be to late

Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation

News From Africa
In 2013 alone, price manipulations due to transfer pricing generated in excess of $1,6 billion in profits for diamond companies in the UAE, and represents a major deprivation for African treasuries which lost much needed tax revenues that could have funded public service, says report.

By Staff Writer
A report shows Zimbabwe lost about $770 million in potential revenue between 2008 and 2012 through undervaluation and transfer pricing of its gems from the Marange diamond fields.
Report by Partnership Africa Canada on illicit financial flows in the diamonds industry said the gems were being exported to the United Arab Emirates (UAE), mostly Dubai.
The report was on the agenda of the just-ended Kimberly Process Certification Scheme (KPCS) Intersessional meeting in Shanghai, China and was presented by PAC’s research director, Alan Martin.
The three-day meeting ended Thursday June 12.
Report says that, the UAE allegedly imported Zimbabwean diamonds…

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Young people: serious about our future….

The Youth Leader

Africa has two major leadership problems: firstly, its leadership is fragmented. And secondly, its leaders are stagnating. We need a bold new vision that will integrate the continent and engage the new generation in building its future.
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As African youth, we are angry, we are restless. We are sick and tired of mediocrity and corruption. We want to make our future. These are questions that l always ask myself , my fellow young people and the senior citizens, Can our leaders make way for us? Can we have a meaningful dialogue without being lectured about the liberation struggles of the past?”

The senior citizens should have confidence that the current generation is building a brighter future and it is that time for my fellow youth, my generation to move out of the way. We should be creating the pathways that connect us with opportunities. We should be building an inter-generational…

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Inheritance and the Future

This was posted by on the mdc website by Michael Mswere
I am not sure if he is the artist ,i hope he is , but i had to share this poem as brilliance should be shared

I was too young to remember
Yet I have inherited this.
I played no part as an innocent child,
But I must face the consequences.

Because the wounds have not healed.
We try to make it better,
But the hurt, the bitterness, runs so deep.
Sometimes it feels like we’re fighting a losing battle.

It is an undeserved part that we play
In trying to undo the injustice.
It is a burden, a sorrowful load
That we never asked to carry on our shoulders.

As the youth of the new millennium
We do not have the experience, the memories
To guide or hinder us on our journey –
We see the world through untainted eyes.

And yet we feel it, we feel it every day.
We sense the anger and the pain.
The blood spilt has dyed society,
It is a dark shadow, always in the back of our minds.

And yet, there is hope;
A light shines that cannot be put out.
It has burned throughout the dark night of the past,
And continues to give courage to the youth today.

Because to those who are brave enough,
To those who know that they must stand up and fight,
The future has been given –
They are the inheritors of the rainbow nation.

The journey will not be an easy one,
Its nature is such that it will not be over quickly.
But as soldiers we accept the challenge –
Together we stand, together we can be victorious.

We accept the past as part of our history,
Yet we do not live by it.
Forming new links and relationships every day,
We find strength in our shared humanity.

As children of Africa, united,
The burden becomes lighter.
The future has been handed to us
And it is a bright one. ………notguilty@21

Is this what Zimbabweans have become?

What can i say? but a excellent article very thought provoking and to the point

Edzai C. Zvobwo

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Who is living it up Zimbos at Home or in the Diasporas?

Let us stand together and fight to take down the dictators that have stifled our progress as a nation. The greedy man and women that have stalled our progress as human beings.

Johannesburg | 18-06-2014 | MGLI

“We are in the water! We are in the Atlantic and we have a white captain therefore we are living it up”. These are the words blurted out by a burly, Rick Ross look-alike Zimbabwean national based in the USA. “We are on our way from Southerton to pick up a Range Rover, we have just purchased for US$113 000.00” alleged an equally flamboyant Harare based individual. “Here in the UK, we are eating sushi and not zimukonde resadza with two small pieces of meat cooked with untreated water like people in Zimbabwe do, we are having a good time in the…

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